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Recently, the Federal Communications Commission entered into the cyber regulatory field in a big way: proposing to fine two companies $10 million for alleged data security breaches.

The FCC is taking action against two telecommunications companies who provided prepaid phone services to low-income residential customers. According to the agency, the companies “collected names, addresses, Social Security numbers, driver’s licenses, and other proprietary information (PI) belonging to low-income Americans and stored them on unprotected Internet servers that anyone in the world could access with a search engine and basic manipulation.”

The FCC justified imposing such large fines in part because “the companies stored such consumer PI in two publicly accessible folders on the Internet without password protection or encryption. By not employing appropriate or even reasonable security measures, the companies exposed their customers to an unacceptable risk of identity theft and other serious consumer harms.” The FCC gave the companies 30 days to seek a reduction in the fine.

The FCC’s $10 million fine followed a $7.4 million settlement with Verizon in September over its use of customer information for marketing, and a $7.5 million settlement with Sprint back in May over “do not call” violations. These multimillion dollar fines are coming from a federal regulator not thought of as a data security and privacy watchdog. The Federal Trade Commission has mainly filled that role.

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The FCC appears to be a new aggressive player on the cyber regulatory field that may have the power to move quicker in issuing fines than the FTC. When faced with a data security situation, the FTC typically issues a complaint setting forth its charges. If the respondent elects to settle the charges, it may sign a consent agreement (without admitting liability), agreeing to the entry of a final order and waiving all right to judicial review.

If contested, the matter is adjudicated, starting with an administrative trial working its way through the Federal courts and ending, potentially with the U.S. Supreme Court. Fines and penalties may be imposed on a respondent for violations of the FTC Act. The FCC, however, can move much more quickly in connection with companies it regulates and may impose a fine once it determines the company failed to protect the “confidentiality of proprietary information of its customers.”

From a risk standpoint, the recent FCC actions represent yet another exposure for telecommunications companies in connection with data security. A cyber insurance product is designed to protect against this risk and should offer coverage for regulatory claims such as those brought by the FTC, FCC or any other governmental agency, federal, state or local.

For those who already purchase a cyber policy to address this risk, it would be prudent to review the policy wordings to assure that regulatory claims are defined as broadly as possible to address new entrants in the privacy regulatory arena.

Additionally, cyber coverage purchasers should look to see whether their policy provides full policy limits for regulatory claims. In some cases, insurers hedge their bets by offering reduced sub-limits of liability for regulatory claims. Given the ramped up efforts by regulators such as the FCC, it is important to make sure adequate limits are in place.